Last month, with healthcare resources stretched thin in many countries, the World Health Organization warned us to expect a shortage of 6 million nurses globally, while calling for urgent investment in nurse education and training. That’s 6 million potential new jobs – an encouraging estimate in our current bleak economic landscape. More nurses likely means a greater need for healthcare support staff too. What do all medical professionals have in common? They use medical terminology to communicate with each other. It’s like a foreign, secret language that you need to learn to join the club.

As we slowly re-emerge, shell shocked, from the ongoing seige that had visited the world these last 5 months, the question of how to move forward will be on everyone’s minds. For many, staying home could go from being a responsible, temporary decision, to an involuntary hardship caused by job loss or decreased work hours.

These 2 factors: time at home, and needing a new career, should put healthcare at the top of your list of possibilities. Not to mention that if you become a nurse or other essential worker, you could be helping fight microscopic enemies like the one (which we shall not name here) that has upended all our lives. There’s no need to go straight to nursing school either; the direct route may or may not be feasible in your current situation. An entry level position such as medical receptionist, is a great way to familiarize yourself with the terrain.

What is essential if you’re considering a career in healthcare, is being able to read, type and spell correctly – the terminology of medical professionals. Yes, a medical dictionary or cheat sheet of medical terms may help, but they can only take you so far. If you want the skills that can help an entry-level employee make enough of an impression on the people in a position to give you a leg up – you simply have to put in the work. Get started today learning medical terminology with our free video series, packed with fun, reliable learning. All the best as you explore the path forward – and stay safe!

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